The proposed Voice to Parliament referendum is not only an important step towards reconciliation with Australia's First Nations, but it could also play a significant role in the country's efforts to combat climate change.

As Australia continues to grapple with the devastating impacts of climate change, it has become increasingly clear that Indigenous knowledge and traditional land management practices can be a valuable tool in mitigating and adapting to these impacts. Indigenous Australians have lived sustainably on this land for tens of thousands of years, and their deep understanding of the natural environment is something that can benefit all Australians.

a copy of the Uluru Statement From The Heart

However, for too long, the voices of Indigenous Australians have been ignored in the country's political decision-making process. The proposed Voice to Parliament would provide a platform for Indigenous Australians to share their knowledge and expertise on matters related to the environment and climate change with the Australian Parliament.

The Voice to Parliament would also help to address some of the systemic barriers that prevent Indigenous Australians from fully participating in the country's economy and society. Indigenous Australians are often disproportionately affected by the impacts of climate change, including bushfires, droughts, and floods, and their communities are often the hardest hit by these disasters.

By giving Indigenous Australians a say in the laws that affect them, the Voice to Parliament could help to ensure that their communities are better equipped to cope with the impacts of climate change. This could include policies that support the development of sustainable industries and provide funding for Indigenous-led initiatives that promote sustainable land management practices.

The proposed referendum has received support from a wide range of organisations, including the Australian Conservation Foundation and the Climate Council. These organisations recognise the value of Indigenous knowledge and traditional land management practices in the fight against climate change and the importance of ensuring that Indigenous Australians have a seat at the table when it comes to making decisions about the environment and climate policy.

It's worth noting that the proposed Voice to Parliament is not a new idea. The Uluru Statement from the Heart, which was developed by Indigenous leaders from across the country in 2017, called for a "First Nations Voice" to be enshrined in the Australian Constitution. The Voice to Parliament referendum is based on the recommendations of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

The proposed referendum is not a radical or divisive proposal. It is a common-sense solution that could benefit all Australians. Indigenous knowledge and traditional land management practices have a role to play in addressing the challenges of climate change, and the Voice to Parliament would help to ensure that these perspectives are taken into account in the country's decision-making process.

In conclusion, the Voice to Parliament referendum is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to change the the constitution to formally recognise our First Nations People, our first climate tech innovators. 

By giving giving our First Nation Australians a say in the laws that affect them, the proposed referendum could help to ensure that their communities are better equipped to cope with the impacts of climate change. It could also promote understanding and reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and ensure that all voices are heard in the country's political decision-making process.

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As Australia continues to face the challenges of climate change, it's essential that we listen to the voices of those who have lived sustainably on this land for tens of thousands of years. The Voice to Parliament is a step in the right direction.

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Climate Salad gives thanks to our First Nations Founders, Camille Goldstone-Henry and Darryl Lyons for sharing their stories in our Yarning Circle and for Brydie Zorz from the Uluru Youth Dialogue for the briefing our climate tech community.

Posted 
Jul 12, 2023
 in 
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